That Grill…

Every year just before Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, Jeep introduces a set of concept vehicles. Rarely do the vehicles make it to the production line but if you’re in Moab for the madness, it can be fun to check out Jeep’s ideas. (And if you’re not into crowds of Jeeps, that’s the week to avoid Moab…)

This year, my Twitter, Facebook, and email basically blew up with the concept vehicles being introduced. I was rather confused because my tastes definitely fall towards older Jeeps but after the third or fourth mention (I’m counting a total of 6 as of now…), I felt like I had to check it out.

As soon as I saw this picture, I totally understood:

Jeep Cherokee concept vehicle

They’d done a take on the 1976-1978 Cherokee.

image

Although they’re calling it a “Chief,” the white striping is really reminiscent of “S” editions. But THAT GRILL is what gets me. It’s what sealed the deal on wanting my FSJ.

Posted in 1977 Jeep Cherokee | Tagged , , | 3 Comments

Learn To Hunt: Bow Fitting

I’m pleased to announce that 3Up Adventures is partnering with Cabela’s as I learn how to hunt! I’ve been wanting to get into archery for awhile now (more on that in a future post) and I’m really excited to get started with such excellent support!

Last week, my new bow, a Cabela’s Instigator by BOWTECH, arrived at my house along with a bunch of awesome accessories, a case, and a couple of targets. It was so hard to be patient all week as I waited to head up to the Grand Junction Cabela’s store to get everything on the bow adjusted and to have my arrows trimmed. Finally, the weekend rolled around and I was walking into the store!

Cabela's Grand Junction archery range

The store manager, Debbie, met me at the front and walked me back to the archery area. She was super friendly and happy to have me in the store. She introduced me to Cody, the archery technician, chatted for a bit and then let Cody and I get down to business. We started by measuring my draw length. Draw length is theoretically a function of your wingspan but as it turned out, I needed a little bit of extra adjustment and we found that a 29″ draw worked well for me.

While making the adjustments to draw length and draw strength, Cody checked to make sure everything was straight and level after shipping. He also installed the stabilizer, a sight, and the wrist strap. At each step, he explained to me how I could make these adjustments on my own if I needed to.

Cabela's Archery Tech

After all the adjustments were done, it was time for me to finally be able to shoot my bow! Cody showed me how to notch the arrow so that the fletchings (the “wings” on the arrow) would pass through the bow cleanly. We made a few adjustments to my draw length, sighted it in, and made sure I was comfortable with shooting.

I don’t have a very relaxed Katniss Everdeen concentration face yet:

Beth at Grand Junction Cabela's archery range

Finally, we cut all of my arrows and assembled most of them with field points. Cody explained that he always saves a quiver full of arrows so that he’s always prepared with straight and undamaged ones for hunting.

Cabela's Archery Tech

Thank you so much to both Cody and Debbie at the Grand Junction Cabela’s. I’m so excited to get started with target shooting and hunting preparations. I had only shot a bow a handful of times before so I was a little nervous but the whole process was really painless and a lot of fun. Just shooting that handful of times in the archery range was almost meditative. I can’t wait to take the bow outside and get some more practice in on my own!

 

The services and products in this post were provided to 3Up Adventures by Cabela’s however all opinions are my own.

cabelas-1

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A Girl’s Guide To Getting Unstuck

Okay, actually, there’s nothing gendered about this guide—the principles of getting your vehicle unstuck are the same whether you’re male or female. Although we might all try our best to avoid finding our vehicles stuck far from pavement it happens to the best of us at times. Dedicated 4x4ers will often have a winch on their vehicle but the rest of us can usually save ourselves from expensive tow bills with minimal equipment:

Tire ruts

Step 1: Take your foot off the accelerator.

Mashing your foot into the accelerator is not going to help matters. In fact, a lot of the time you can go from being “kinda stuck” to “really stuck” in a few seconds by spinning your tires in the snow, mud or sand.

Step 2: Visually inspect your situtation

Now is the time to figure out why you’re stuck. The main reason is likely that you don’t have enough traction and your tires are simply spinning in place. However, if you’ve already spun the tires enough, you might find that the frame of your vehicle (or at least the axle) is now resting on the ground. If this has happened, it’s time to start digging. I usually carry a short shovel for this purpose but if you don’t have a shovel, get creative. Since the vehicle is already struggling for traction, you don’t want to have to fight any additional friction as well!

Tire Ruts

Step 3: Air down

If you still have your tires at full highway air pressure, it’s time to change that. Most cars have pressure of about 35-50 psi in the tires. Airing down can be a little bit of an art: there is no hard and fast amount you should air down to. In general, I air down a little bit at a time dropping first to 18-20 psi, reevaluating, then dropping to 15-10 psi. In some situations it might be okay to go as low as 5 psi—much lower than that and you risk unseating your tire from the bead of the wheel. You’ll want to have a low pressure tire gauge since most gauges don’t read accurately below about 20 psi (it can be helpful to have a regular gauge too for airing back up). Let the air out by pushing in the center of the valve stem which lets air pass out of the tires.

I carry a compressor in the Jeep so I’m not near as afraid to air down as I would be otherwise since I have the ability to air the tires back to a better driving pressure once I’m unstuck. Once you’ve aired down your tires, they will experience excess wear running on asphalt and they’ll also get hot increasing chances of a blowout.

(If I’m going to be on dirt roads for an extended period, I’ll often air down to at least 20 psi just for comfort. This can often help prevent getting stuck but it also removes some of your margin of error if you do.)

Low PSI

Step 4: Attempt to extricate

Attempt this step carefully! At this point, I tend to attempt to drive out of the situation with my head hanging out the window alternately checking my front tire and my back tire for traction. Often, airing down your tires will be enough to allow you to “walk out” of your situation, especially if you didn’t bury the vehicle before admitting that you were stuck.

Gently press on the accelerator. If nothing happens, continue on to the next steps. If you’re out, great! Congratulations!

Step 5: Attempt to find additional traction

Your car is stuck because it doesn’t have enough traction so now your job is to find a way to get it more traction. Tree branches can form additional traction. I’ve used a pack as traction. Vehicle floor mats could work as well. Once, I used found carpet strips to give traction on silty mud (reallllly slippery!)

Getting jeep unstuck

Step 6:  Get moving

Hopefully, by now, you’re mobilizing. Beyond airing down and giving yourself a little bit of extra traction it’s hard to do much else by yourself without a winch.

Faster isn’t always better but once you’re moving again, the gas pedal can be your friend! I once got the van stuck in soft desert wash sand, aired down, and got moving again only to feel myself getting stuck. I gave the van a little extra gas and found that the extra momentum was enough to get me back onto the hardpack.

Step 7: Carrying the tools for help

If you weren’t able to get yourself out, it’s time to start walking towards help or calling for a tow truck. Fortunately, the above tricks usually get you free!

Just in case you run into a friendly stranger who might want to help but isn’t prepared, carrying your own recovery strap and “D-ring” or shackle can be a real life saver! Knowing where your vehicle has a good tow point is always nice before you have to go crawling around in the mud to find it!

Posted in Nerdy, Technical | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment